William Stout

William Stout

Scarecrow of OZ

  • Ink and watercolor on board
  • 14" x 9", artwork
  • 23.125" x 18.875" x 1", framed
  • Contemporary
  • $7,500

Description
Inspired by works of the great early 20th-century children’s book illustrators, such as Arthur Rackham, Kay Nielsen and Edmund Dulac, contemporary artist William Stout created a series of paintings depicting characters from popular children’s stories and folktales.

One of the characters from Stout’s “Wizard of Oz” series is the Scarecrow who Stout portrays in the pose of Auguste Rodin’s “Thinker.” The image brings to mind the Scarecrow’s wish for a brain so that he could “think of things I never thought before.”

Provenance
Acquired by American Legacy Fine Arts directly from the artist

Exhibitions
“The External and The Contemplative” at American Legacy Fine Arts, Pasadena, CA, October 24-November 21, 2015


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Additional Available Artwork by William Stout

  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents " The Lion and the Fox" a painting by William Stout.
  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents "Station Aerie" a painting by William Stout.
  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents "Siegfried and the Bear" a painting by William Stout.
  • American legacy Fine Arts presents "Greene & Greene Bus Stop" a painting by William Stout.
  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents "Valkyrie's Battle Song" a painting by Williams Stout
  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents "The Flame Bird" a painting by William Stout.
  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents "Sunset Dragon" a painting by William Stout.
  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents "Erda" a painting by Williams Stout
  • American Legacy Fine Arts presents "Fafnir Sleeps" a painting by William Stout

Description

Description
Inspired by works of the great early 20th-century children’s book illustrators, such as Arthur Rackham, Kay Nielsen and Edmund Dulac, contemporary artist William Stout created a series of paintings depicting characters from popular children’s stories and folktales.

One of the characters from Stout’s “Wizard of Oz” series is the Scarecrow who Stout portrays in the pose of Auguste Rodin’s “Thinker.” The image brings to mind the Scarecrow’s wish for a brain so that he could “think of things I never thought before.”